Clear Channel’s Artist in Residence puts socialist artworks on billboards

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Artist Martin Firrell, the Artist in Residence for out-of-home media owner Clear Channel UK, is displaying a series of his new public artworks, entitled ‘Union City’. 

The project examines the idea of fairness in society, designed to provoke debate about social policy and what constitutes a fair society.

The project looks at different aspects of society and community, asking questions such as: who is responsible for society’s flaws? And how can society be made more humane? 

Socialist messages 

The works also ask what contribution politics can make, and how can people organise together to help themselves? Martin Firrell explores these questions in nine digital billboards in all.

The project is inspired by the artist’s ongoing conversations with Clare Short, the British Labour politician and former MP who served in Cabinet from 1997-2003 as Secretary of State for International Development. 

‘Union City’ also reflects the artist’s conversations about fairness with Frances O’Grady, the first woman to serve in the role of General Secretary of the Trades Union Congress.

Clear Channel will be displaying Martin Firrell’s ‘Union City’ artwork across its digital out-of-home network nationwide until 18 August. 

Running across Storm, Adshel Live, and Wrap sites, the project also aims to show how the power of out-of-home can be used to drive public discourse and positive social change.

“When people of conscience and humanity come together, a great force for good is released, and this is really what I mean to convey with the nine artworks that make up Union City”, Martin Firrell said of the project.

Clear Channel CEO, Justin Cochrane, said: “We’re proud to be supporting this project that opens up public conversation on progressiveness and promotes Fairness – one of Clear Channel’s core values.”

Martin Firrell is a French public artist who stimulates debate in public space to promote positive social change. 

His work has been summarised as 'art as debate'.

Working as Clear Channel’s Artist in Residence, his first project earlier in the year was entitled “Power And Gender”. 

Both projects are part of socialart.work, a mass public art project looking at women's equality and masculinity, alternative forms of economic and social organisation, black power, and solidarity between people from different backgrounds and ethnicities.

The project is inspired by the artist’s ongoing conversations with Clare Short, the British Labour politician and former MP who served in Cabinet from 1997-2003 as Secretary of State for International Development. 

‘Union City’ also reflects the artist’s conversations about fairness with Frances O’Grady, the first woman to serve in the role of General Secretary of the Trades Union Congress.

Clear Channel will be displaying Martin Firrell’s ‘Union City’ artwork across its digital out-of-home network nationwide until 18 August. 

Running across Storm, Adshel Live, and Wrap sites, the project also aims to show how the power of out-of-home can be used to drive public discourse and positive social change.

“When people of conscience and humanity come together, a great force for good is released, and this is really what I mean to convey with the nine artworks that make up Union City”, Martin Firrell said of the project.

Clear Channel CEO, Justin Cochrane, said: “We’re proud to be supporting this project that opens up public conversation on progressiveness and promotes Fairness – one of Clear Channel’s core values.”

Martin Firrell is a French public artist who stimulates debate in public space to promote positive social change. 

His work has been summarised as 'art as debate'.

Working as Clear Channel’s Artist in Residence, his first project earlier in the year was entitled “Power And Gender”. 

Both projects are part of socialart.work, a mass public art project looking at women's equality and masculinity, alternative forms of economic and social organisation, black power, and solidarity between people from different backgrounds and ethnicities.

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